January / February 2017

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January / February 2017

A collection of news, articles and other featured content about January / February 2017.

While there can be plenty of debate about the vitality of the U.S.

It's a warehouse. It's not that complicated. These two themes come up repeatedly during a conversation with Costco President and CEO Craig Jelinek and EVP of Merchandising Ron Vachris.

Artificial intelligence clearly reached buzzword utopia in 2016, but the groundwork was laid back in 2011 by the appearance of IBM Watson on the TV game show "Jeopardy!" The artificial intelligence (AI) computing platform made headlines by easily beating its human competitors.

The biggest question for the future of online grocery commerce comes down to the last mile. As in, who's going to drive it—retailers or customers? Food retailers who want to use online commerce will have to make a hard choice between three major options: delivery, store pickup or both.

Ambitious sustainability goals Walmart revealed in late 2005 were dismissedby some at the time as a publicity stunt on the part of a company looking to bolster its reputation.

A Letter from the President and CEO
Leslie G. Sarasin

We recently published a study sizing up the risks of counterfeiting that indicated a tenth of all food purchases in the developed world are in some way contaminated by counterfeit ingredients.

The retail industry continues to experience dramatic change, with technology and shifting customer demands creating significant challenges and unprecedented opportunities. This is especially true in the dynamic world of supply chain where five macro trends are unfolding. They include: 1.

Use of the word friction in a retail context sounded strange the first time I heard it.

Consumer confidence remains high for the grocery industry, per FMI's U.S. Grocery Shopper Trends research.

Amazon's announcement of a new pilot program that offers customers a boundary-less experience for shopping and checkout is justly being positioned as a game-changer for the food retail industry and greater retail supply chain.

Food-at-home prices in 2016 are predicted to reflect a 0.25 percent to 1.25 percent decline, according to the USDA Economic Research Service, making the past year the first time since 1967 that retail food prices reflected annual deflation.

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